Welcome to Our Site

  • Cemeteries

    USGenWeb Project has stored all the transcriptions that have been submitted to date for this project.

    Cemeteries of Lewis County include many that are reminders of ghost towns long gone, but not forgotten.

    Thank you volunteers for your continual support with transcribing our local cemeteries.

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  • Lewis County History

    Lewis County was created on December 19, 1845, by the provisional government of Oregon Territory, named after the pioneer explorer, Meriwether Lewis.

    Visually, Lewis County was once so large geographically that is has become known as the “mother of all counties” – spanning all the land west of the Cowlitz River and north to present-day Sitka, Alaska.

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  • Centralia 1902
  • Onalaska 1918
  • Chehalis 1920
  • Cheahlis 1908
  • Farming 1950
  • Farming 1949
  • Chehalis 1920
  • Picnic 1922
  • St. Helen's Hospital 1907
  • Onalaska 1950
  • Chehalis 1918
  • Mrs. Washington Contestants 1957
  • Onalaska 1944
  • Onalaska 1944

  • REARCH LIBRARY

    Research

    Climbing your family tree. How-to proceed in your genealogical quest. More »

  • PUBLICATIONS FOR SALE

    publications

    Publications for Sale compiled by LCGS. Cemetery, Birth, Death, Marriage More »

  • SURNAME FILE

    surname file

    LCGS Members' Surname File | Email us queries & questions. More »


LCGS Speaker & Topic | Meeting Date: Tuesday, 19 Sept 2017

Mary Kircher Roddy:  "Ins & Outs of Indexes: Keys to Unlocking Probates, Deeds & More"

Indexes for county records can be the key to finding deeds, probates and other records. As Family search continues to digitize and make available more and more records, it's crucial to be familiar with the different indexing systems and how to use them.  Whether you use the FamilySearch website, order microfilm, or go directly to a county office to find records, you need to be aware of how the records might be organized.

County record books contain various systems for indexing records. Generally, you first have to search an index volume to find a name, and gather the details of book and page numbers directing them where to find the actual deed, will, or other document in the record books.

Much of what FamilySearch is putting up are Image-only records, and are not searchable by name. The name indexing of these records lags behind the process of making the images available, but because of the county-level indexes which are also being digitized, it probably isn't immediately necessary to spend volunteer hours to index these records if users learn how to navigate the index books.

She will cover several common indexing schemes used in count books for deed, naturalization papers papers, probate files and more include the "l-m-n-r-t Key Index." "Division tables to Graves Tabular Initial Index," "The Campbell Index," "Burr's Index," and others. This presentation will give us the skills to recognize the different types of indexes and be comfortable deciphering how to locate their chosen record.


Mary Kircher Roddy grew up in San Rafael, California.  She earned a Bachelor degree in Liberal Studies from the University of California, Riverside in 1982 and a Master in Professional Accounting from the University of Texas in 1984. She earned a certificate in Genealogy and Family History at the University of Washington in 2005.

Mary became interested in genealogy in 2000 in anticipation of a sabbatical in Ireland where her husband was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Limerick. She was sure she would complete all her Irish genealogy while her husband taught at UL and her children attended Monaleen School.  Seventeen years later, the genealogy is still a work in progress. But the trip to Ireland awakened something deep in her Celtic bloodlines, the Irish tradition of the Seanachi, the storytellers and historians of yore.

Mary has published articles in Family Chronicle and Internet Genealogy.  She's currently working on a novel set in the San Francisco area in 1900 and 1901, based on stories of several of her ancestors and their associates which she discovered in her genealogical research.

Mary frequently lectures around the Seattle area, and is an active member of Seattle Genealogical Society. She is a regular webinar presenter with Legacy Family Tree Webinars.

She is a member of the Genealogical Speakers Guild, The Association of Professional Genealogists, and the National Genealogical Society.

 Visitors are always welcome!

The meeting is at 6:30 pm, with doors open at 6:15 at St. John's Lutheran Church,
2190 Jackson Hwy, Chehalis, WA 98532